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kluelos

BitComet Tech Support
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Everything posted by kluelos

  1. This is fundamentally a disk write error. Don't lose sight of that. Every disk drive made in the last 10 years, and most even before that, incorporates firmware to check the drive and report problems. It's called Self-Monitoring And Reporting Technology, and it's part of what flashes by so quickly during initial bootup before the machine goes into graphics mode. That usually makes it all but impossible to catch. So you'll need a SMART reporting utility to see if your disk drive has been reporting errors. This is pretty urgent, since a drive that starts getting this kind of error can permanently fail at any moment. The only such easy-to-use utilities I know of that are free, are also manufacturer-specific, so check the manufacturer's web site or include the brand name in your search. Or go with one of the paid/shareware utilities. A lot of them want to monitor the drive, which is not exactly what you want -- and it's one more process running/loading down the system. All you need is one that reports the current SMART status to tell you if you've been accumulating errors. If you're comfortable with DOS-based command-line tools, then try this one. I'm not saying it's definitely a failing disk drive, but you sure want to check that quickly.
  2. The number and kinds of problems you're having don't seem to fit. I suspect that your problems with BitComet are just symptomatic -- it's stressing and using your computer harder than most other programs you run do. If that's the case, BitComet isn't the cause, it's just one of the victims. Where I've seen this problem before is in hardware defects. The primary suspects are system memory, and the network connection. Visit memtest.org and download memtest86+ in whatever format's most convenient for you. If you have a CD burner and know how to use it, go for the bootable ISO format, since it's easiest. (Just burn the CD, then boot it and let it run.) For the network connection, it's usually best to swap it out and see if your problems go away. If you can temporarily borrow a friend's, do that. If you have a desktop, network cards are widely available and very cheap, under US$10, so it might be worth your while to just buy one for testing and possible replacement. If you have a desktop, it's a little more expensive for a PCI card, but that's what you'll need. Depending on the system, you may need to disable the built-in network connection in the bios first, but it usually isn't necessary. You'll have to set up a new network connection using the replacement card, but that's pretty routine.
  3. From the Bittorrent FAQ: seed: A computer that has a complete copy of a certain torrent. If there are no seeds, nobody has a complete copy to share with you or anyone else. Unless some seeders appear, your download isn't going to finish. You can wait and hope one appears, or you can try to find the same material in a different torrent that is being seeded.
  4. The files were placed in your preferred download directory -- that's where you told BitComet to put the finished files. Where's that? Look in your preferences (which is where you set or change things like where you'd prefer to store downloaded files when finished) and see what it says.
  5. Wrong place. This forum is for problems with BitComet. Once it's downloaded the files, its job is done. You need information about what to do with the files after you've got them. Try here: http://www.p2pforums.com/viewtopic.php?t=8115
  6. BitDave's right, but let's clarify it all. We have two different units here: bits, and bytes. A bit is a BIinary digiT (Cute, huh?) In representational terms, it's either a one or a zero, since it's binary and can therefore have only two states. In electrical terms it's either a higher voltage or a lower one. In some systems it's either on or off. A byte is eight bits. Why? Historical reasons, closely related to telegraphy. And it really doesn't matter. Eight was the minimum necessary, and was reasonably convenient, and it's far, far too late to change things now. It's what's used. Deal. When it comes to bandwidth, what we're talking about is transmitting information over a specific time, arbitrarily, the second. So many bits per second, or bytes per second. You use the one that's most meaningful for whatever you happen to be doing with the information. These days, for most systems, bits aren't terribly useful, while bytes are. Being careful about the limitations of analogies, you can think of a bit as a letter, and a byte as a word. Now forget it, that's a terrible analogy. So think of morse code. Dots and dashes used to indicate letters. It's the letters that are useful. Now forget that analogy too. A single dot is the letter "E" and a single dash is the letter "T". Funnily enough, those are the two most commonly-used letters in English. Today's tech moves very fast, so now we speak of kilobits and kilobytes, to deal with actual quantities. That is, "thousand-ish" quantities of each. Not exactly 1000 but close, and we won't go there now. If you're a marketer, though, you love the kilobits, because they make things sound so much larger. That's how they'll sell you your home broadband connection - "it's a million bits per second!!1!". Which it is, yes, but it's more useful to express it as 125 kilobytes per second since bytes are the useful quantum for computers. Doesn't sound as impressive, though. Sadly, we don't widely use greek letters for this stuff anymore, so we abbreviate bits as "b" and bytes as "B", to the everlasting confusion of the lay public. If you don't know that b/s is way different from B/s, you may believe it's all bs (sorry) and doesn't matter. But you also won't particularly notice, and won't be really careful about whether it's b or B. You have to be careful when you're calculating with them or communicating about them though. So case matters. It matters a lot. ---------------------- And one point that I didn't emphasize enough: all this talk about upstream speed is because it will directly and dramatically affect your downstream speed.
  7. Check to see if your listen port is really open, at www.canyouseeme.org. You wouldn't be the first person to find they've got a firewall they never knew they had.
  8. Check the BitComet log for any problems. Also check the peers status for the torrent in question, and look at the number of seeds and peers shown. Too many sites retain torrents that are essentially dead - nobody has seeded them for a long time. These should be removed but too often, they aren't. You also need to consider your new hardware. Did Qwest give you just a modem, or is it a modem/router combo with a firewall? They often do the latter. Very, very bad idea to connect without a firewall at all. Firmware firewalls are preferable to software, but you do need one (1) firewall.
  9. Test your listen port to see if it's really open, at www.canyouseeme.org. Sounds like something is blocking it still.
  10. I don't know. You seem pretty dense. But we'll try a third time here: That means and meant, go in to your bitcomet settings, in the advanced/connection section and set protocol encryption to "always".
  11. Now, and separately, let me correct another budding misconception. DHT is not necessary for successful transfers. In your Options, you can even disable DHT as many people do, and still torrent to your heart's content. Some of the torrents you download will specifically have DHT disabled for that torrent, and they will work just fine. DHT is not necessary for file transfers. DHT finds additional peers. That's all it does. It finds peers and does not use the tracker to find them. You don't even need them if the tracker's giving you enough peers. But to have DHT not working is sometimes a SYMPTOM of another problem, namely a closed listening port. That closed port is the problem, not the absence of DHT. There are other, more important symptoms such as the lack of remote-initiated connections. So don't attach too much weight to the DHT connection.
  12. You don't need to in any case. ADSL uses a different part of the phone spectrum, and a simple, cheap, & included filter keeps it from interfering with normal phone service. You can have DSL and standard phone service on the same line at the same time. Just to be clear. ADSL does not tie up your phone line for voice service. If that's been holding you back from ADSL, you've been misinformed. Gotta love the way this subject always turns into a mess so quickly. When you insert a router into a connection, it creates a "subnet". There are now two sides to the connection. One side is the Internet, or "WAN" side, and all the rules are dictated by your ISP. You must follow them. The other side is the Subnet, or "LAN" side, and the rules are pretty much whatever you want them to be. From the ISP to the router, on the WAN side, an IP address gets assigned via DHCP to the router. If you visit whatsmyip.org, the request goes from your computer to the router, thence to the internet. The reply comes back to the router, and thence to your computer. The web site will show you the IP address of the router. NOT the IP address of your computer. The internet doesn't know your computer exists, all it sees is the router. It doesn't know or care what's behind the router. This has nothing whatever to do with what happens on the LAN side of the router, inside your subnet. There you can do things any way you please and can get working. On the LAN side, by usual default, the router assigns IP addresses to the computers connected to it, via DHCP. These are not the same as, and have no relationship to, the IP address that the ISP assigned to the router. These are the addresses that will show up in IPCONFIG as your computer's IP address. Only your router knows or cares about these. The internet does not know, does not care, and cannot communicate with them. All communication with the Internet must flow through the router. INTERNET----------------------------------<|=YOUR=|>------------------SUBNET WAN SIDE---------------------------------<|ROUTER |>------------------LAN SIDE ISP's RULES-------------------------------<|=HERE=|>------------------YOUR RULES IP address from ISP---------------------<|ROUTER|>------------------ IP from router Dynamic addresses expire. They are leased, although the lease term can be "forever", if the assignor permits that. (Your ISP might not permit it.) But any time the leaseholder disconnects, the lease on its address is terminated. When it reconnects, it has to get another leased, dynamic IP address. That might or might not be the same as the one it had before. When you turn off your computer, the lease on the IP address that it got from the router expires. That address can now be reassigned. If the router isn't turned off, it may continue to have the same IP address from your ISP, but this does not affect what happens on the LAN side at all. On the other hand, you can be connected and browsing or torrenting or whatever, when your router's IP address lease expires. It gets automatically renewed, though not necessarily at the same IP address it had before. You will probably never even notice that this happened. The two sides, internet and subnet, are that utterly separated. All this talk about needing a static IP is strictly on the subnet, or LAN side. It doesn't concern the WAN side at all. Your router has a firewall. If it's like most routers, it will only open a port on that firewall, into the subnet, to a specific subnet IP address. In order for things to work properly, your computer had better be at that IP address. Giving your computer a static, not dynamic, address from the router, assures that your computer will indeed be at that address. If the address were dynamic, then it might be assigned away from your computer. There might be nothing now at that address while your computer wonders where all its traffic went? Better, there might be another computer at that address now, unaware that there's a hole in the firewall pointing at it. That other computer almost certainly will not be expecting, or know what to do with, traffic coming through that hole. If you're lucky it will merely ignore it. But with a static address, it won't change, and it'll always be your computer at that IP, with BitComet there and ready to handle traffic on that port, through that hole in your firewall. You may ask, "can I get a static IP address from my ISP?", and the answer, as always, is "YE$, OF COUR$E! We're alway$ plea$ed to provide our victim$ cu$tomers whatever they wi$h!" I hope that makes things a little clearer.
  13. Because your ISP wasn't throttling you before? The problem suddenly started two weeks ago?
  14. That sounds suspiciously like bandwidth throttling. Check google for reports of your ISP doing this. In the meantime, in your Advanced/Connection settings, enable encryption and see if that doesn't pick your speed back up.
  15. To quote myself: This may be related to your upload speed setting. Most home broadband connections are asymmetrical, with downstream speed a lot faster than upstream. But the upstream part is important. Not only are you sharing pieces outbound, but every piece you recieve must be acknowledged or it's assumed the packet was lost, and needs to be re-sent. Then there's other internet use. So it's quite possible for all that traffic to jam your upstream connection. You need to limit your global maximum upload speed in BitComet, to about 80% of your actual, measured upstream rate. Don't guess and don't assume it's the same as your download speed -- it isn't. Find a web site that will tell you your actual speed both up and down. Pick a site that's reasonably nearby: if you live in London, don't choose one based in Taiwan or San Francisco. Shut down everything else that might use bandwidth before you do your test. Do a screen copy of the results. Do a screen copy. Do a screen copy. Now convert, taking due care with unit conversions, the actual upstream rate to BitComet's standard of KB/s, and set your global maximum upload speed to 80% of that. This will keep BitComet's uploads from drowning out the acknowledgements, and give you enough headroom to perform other tasks at the same time.
  16. You're being advised that you're asking for help with a game, in a forum whose purpose is help with BitComet. You should find a correct forum for questions like this. BTW, "aloud" = "audible", as in "to speak aloud". The word you want is "allowed" = "permitted".
  17. IMSMR, you cannot burn a DVD with media player unless you have Media Edition or have installed MS Movie Maker. Otherwise it isn't supported. RealPlayer likewise doesn't support burning DVD's. They only support CD's, and that not very well. You need other burning software to accomplish the task. But if you want the result to work on a normal DVD player, well, you just stepped off a very steep cliff. That subject is, err, complex.
  18. First thing to try: Remove the task (you'll have to, in order for this to work), then add it again. The task properties box should appear. Click the "Advanced" tab, and down at the bottom, change the torrent encoding. This is the only time you can change it, so you have to remove and re-add it.
  19. Don't overlook the possibility of a hardware problem, especially on a new computer. It never hurts to be sure, so download memtest86+ from memtest.org, in whatever version works for you. (If you have a CD burner and know how to use it, go with the bootable ISO version.) It doesnt' take long and can save you a lot of grief.
  20. This may be related to your upload speed setting. Most home broadband connections are asymmetrical, with downstream speed a lot faster than upstream. But the upstream part is important. Not only are you sharing pieces outbound, but every piece you recieve must be acknowledged or it's assumed the packet was lost, and needs to be re-sent. Then there's other internet use. So it's quite possible for all that traffic to jam your upstream connection. You need to limit your global maximum upload speed in BitComet, to about 80% of your actual, measured upstream rate. Don't guess and don't assume it's the same as your download speed -- it isn't. Find a web site that will tell you your actual speed both up and down. Pick a site that's reasonably nearby: if you live in London, don't choose one based in Taiwan or San Francisco. Shut down everything else that might use bandwidth before you do your test. Do a screen copy of the results. Do a screen copy. Do a screen copy. Now convert, taking due care with unit conversions, the actual upstream rate to BitComet's standard of KB/s, and set your global maximum upload speed to 80% of that. This will keep BitComet's uploads from drowning out the acknowledgements, and give you enough headroom to perform other tasks at the same time.
  21. At first impression, that sounds like a firewall is blocking the traffic. It's the first thing to check, anyway.
  22. I'm assuming you've done a proper install of BitComet on the home computer, not just copied over the directory. If not, do that first. Then stop each of your torrents, double-check that the download location is correct and pointing where you think it's pointing -- to the incomplete files -- then do a manual hash check and let it complete. Restart the torrent and it should pick up where you left off.
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